Why You Should Have a Complete Facebook Business Page and How You Do It

It may come as a shock, but Facebook is not only used to tag friends in funny videos or to keep track of people’s birthdays. Facebook is often the channel we turn to when we need to find information about a person, a company or a specific place. Therefore, it is important to include all the information a page visitor might want to find out about you. Not sure what to include on your page? We’ve listed the most important things.

1. Create a name and write a description

The first step is to decide on a name and to tell your visitors about yourselves. For example, if your company name is The Bun Factory, the name of your Facebook page should also be The Bun Factory. By having the same name on all your channels, people can easily search for and find your page. The “About” page is an important part where you can introduce yourselves in a short and concise way (1-2 sentences), to let your page visitors know who your are, what you do and why they should choose you. For example, in The Bun Factory’s case their “About” page could say: “Welcome to The Bun Factory for straight-out-the-oven-yummy buns! Swing by our cozy bakery or just stay home, and we’ll deliver your cravings straight to your door.” Also make sure to choose a relevant picture to the “About” section.

2. Choose a profile picture and cover photo

Yes, having a picture of your cat as a profile or cover photo would be cute. It would also confuse your page visitors of what your company actually does. A picture that represents your company and your offerings would be preferable, and would show the visitors who you are and what you do. Choose a picture of your product, service or something else that represents you. For The Bun Factory, a picture of their freshly baked buns as a profile and cover photo would be most relevant.

3. Choose a Call-to-action button

At the top of the page you’ll find a call-to-action button, which encourages your page visitors to take an action. A call-to-action button can help you direct people to your shop, website, book a reservation and more. You can choose your button based on the purpose of your Facebook page. Want to sell a product by directing people to your site? Then “buy now” could be a suitable button. Maybe you want your page visitors to contact you? Then you can consider having “send message” as your call-to-action button instead. In The Bun Factory’s case, they’d want to redirect people that visited their Facebook page to their site, where they can order buns delivered to their doorstep.

4. Information about your company

Information such as your company’s address, email address, phone number, website, opening hours, floor number and pictures is important to include in order to get the most out of your Facebook page. This will help your customers when they look for information about you and it will also make it easier for them to contact you.

5. Categories

Relevant categories can help people to easily find your page and to get an overview of your offering. Choose at least 3 categories that best suits and describes your company and change them whenever you feel like they aren’t relevant anymore.

After filling your Facebook page with all of the relevant information you can start building your target group. This is done in order to attract people that most likely will find your company and the content your share interesting. Lastly, make sure you share your page in your personal feed, invite friends to your page and learn to use page statistics to get a deeper understanding of your page visitors and what posts gains most traction. Now you’re all set, good luck!

Author

Sitav Taha

As a new graduate of the Marketing Program in my small and cozy hometown down south (also known as Växjö), I packed my bags and moved to Stockholm to start my internship as a PR-intern. After 3 months of what felt like the most amazing crash course to PR, it was time to learn something new. So I asked myself, what does a marketer actually do? The question was so simple, but yet so complex that I had to live it to learn it. And that was when I became...